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July 1998

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Subject:
From:
Hal Morris <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
A LISTSERV list for discussions pertaining to New York State history." <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Wed, 15 Jul 1998 09:47:57 -0400
Content-Type:
TEXT/PLAIN
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TEXT/PLAIN (67 lines)
Nell Irwin Painter's _Sojourner Truth_, p22 notes that in 1827, slaves
born after 1799 could be held as indentured (still slaves in effect -
whether the census would describe them as such or not I don't know) until
age 28 if male, 25 if female.  Slaves born before 1799 were free
unconditionally.

The footnote cites a secondary source - Carl Nordstrom, "The New York
Slave Code", in _Afro-Americans in New York Life and History 4, no. 1
(January 1980), p19-20.

I thought maybe someone answered this, but couldn't find it if they did.
I know I've seen it elsewhere too, inmore detail, but can't lay hands on
it now.

Hal Morris: [log in to unmask]   --  Editor of:
* H-SHEAR Web pages: http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~shear
* Tales of the Early Republic: http://www.panix.com/~hal
  Web Resources:  Bibliography, Biographical Dict... (work in progress)
* Jacksonian Miscellanies: free email weekly of source exerpts.

On Mon, 6 Jul 1998, Edward Knoblauch wrote:

> Curiously, the 1830 federal census shows 75 slaves in NYState:
>
> 26 in Montgomery County
> 17 in New York County (Manhattan)
> 15 in Oneida County
>   8 in Washington County
>   4 in Putnam County
>   3 in Chenango County
>   2 in Albany County
>
> Does anyone have an explanation for this? Because the remaining slaves seem
> concentrated in rural counties, I reject the idea that the slaves are
> 'sojourners'. Also, 52 of the 75 (69%) were females between 0-35 years of
> age. In 1840, when 4 slaves are listed, they are all females (3 in King's
> County, 1 in Putnam). By 1850, no slaves are listed in NY State.
>
> Curious, eh?
>
> Edward Knoblauch
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: John Weiss <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Monday, July 06, 1998 9:59 AM
> Subject: EMANCIPATION DAY IN NY STATE
>
>
> >Today in 1827 brought final emancipation to New York State.
> >
> >I am trying to find out how many remaining slaves there were in New York
> >State who were emancipated on 4 July 1827.
> >
> >I should be grateful for any help towards finding the number, and if
> >possible the demographic distribution. Names of newspapers current at
> >that date would be useful in the absence of hard data, though collections
> >here in the UK might be patchy.
> >
> >John Weiss <[log in to unmask]>
> >----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >Researching the four thousand Black Americans
> >who took their freedom in the War of 1812
> >
>

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