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October 1996

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From:
David William Voorhees <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Fri, 27 Sep 1996 12:28:31 -0400 (EDT)
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The merits of preserving and studying the recently discovered
archaeological site in downtown Albany will be readily recognized by
historians, scholars, and the general public.  They may well, however,
escape politicians and businessmen, whose main concern is a quick return
on the dollar.  The Albany archeaological site could make a great tourist
attraction and anchor for downtown Albany, something that that city badly
needs.  Past governmental policies have virtually destroyed the city, cut
off its views of the river, and left vast areas of parking lots for
businesses which no longer exist.  That Albany is virtually a ghost town
save for the state offices is readily apparent to anyone who walks the
city's streets.  The Albany site could bring in thousands of tourists and
their dollars, much as Jamestown, Va., does, giving a boost to a badly
sagging economy, while the State Dormitory Office Building, while not only
destroying another valuable historic site, will bring in only 300 state
workers who will flee the downtown area come 5 o'clock and will add
virtually nothing to the economy of the region.

David William Voorhees
editor, Papers of Jacob Leisler
        de Halve Maen

From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct  1 08:12:44 1996
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The 17th century archeological site in Albany, New York was backfilled yesterday.  Immediate action is necessary!! Construction will begin soon and this site will be lost forever.  Please contact the Govenor, John Buono, Commissioner Castro, and your legislators about this outrage.
From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct  1 13:55:08 1996
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Date: Tue, 01 Oct 1996 14:03:17 -0400
From: Julie Daniels <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject:  NYS Archives Publication Receives National Awards
content-length: 1040

The New York State Archives? publication, Consider the Source:
Historical Records in the Classroom, has received two national
awards: The Society of American Archivists? 1996 Philip M. Hamer and
Elizabeth Hamer Kegan Award for increasing public awareness of
manuscripts and archives, and the American Association for State and
Local History?s Award of Merit for excellence in local, state and regional
history.

Consider the Source is designed to help records repository staff  work
with educators and help educators locate, research and use historical
records in the classroom.  It contains reproductions of 26 historical
records and ready-to-use lesson plans and worksheets. The records
date from the 1790s to the 1960s and the lesson plans are
interdisciplinary and cover every grade level.  

Consider the Source may be previewed on-line at
http://www.sara.nysed.gov/services/teachers/ctspromo.htm. To
order a copy, complete the on-line order form located at the address
above, or call (518) 473-8037, or E-mail [log in to unmask]

From [log in to unmask] Mon Sep 30 18:40:06 1996
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Subject: NYNY 1685-1689
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 96 18:28:04 EST
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Organization: MLS Online
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1685
Feb 6		The Duke of York is crowned as James II. New York becomes a royal
province.   
Feb 24		Connecticut governor Robert Treat and New York governor Thomas Dongan
ratify
 		          the boundary between their colonies.
Nov 4		Governor Dongan issues a patent to the van Rensselaer cousins for the
Manor of
 		         van Renssalaerwyck.
Nov 5		The van Rensselaer patent is confirmed.

	City - Former Dutch receiver general Nicholas Bayard, a nephew of Peter
Stuyvesant
 		and a favorite of governor Thomas Dongan, is appointed mayor for the year.

1686
Apr 27		New York colonial governor Thomas Dongan grants New York City a new
charter,
 		           confirming and enlarging the cityÕs municipal powers. The city is
given control 
                 over vacant Manhattan shore lands extending to the low water
mark.
Jul 22		Albany City (Beverwick, William Stadt, New Orange) is incorporated by
patent. 

	City - James II bans the first House of Representatives and prohibits printing
presses.   
 		     **    Businessman Stephanus Van Cortlandt is appointed mayor for this
and each of the next two years.    **
           The first member of the Rhinelander family, future sugar and shipping
business owners, arrives from    
           Germany.
	State - The colony's new Charter of Liberties is disallowed.    **    The
English, French
 		and Senecas all try diplomacy.     **    Much of the coast of Maine, known as
 		Cornwall County, bought from the Earl of Sterling and governed by New York,
is
 		transferred to Massachusetts.

1687
Jul 10		The forces of Jacques Rene de Brisay, marquis of Denonville, governor
general of
 		           New France arrive at the future site of  Pultneyville.
Jul 11		Denonville lands a large invasion force  - 1500 Frenchmen, including the
Baron
 		de Lathonton (author), Daniel Duluth (founder of the city), Henri de Tonty
 		(explorer), Fran¨ois dÕOrvillers and Louis Hector de Callieres - and 1500
 		Ottawa and Mohawk Indian allies) at the mouth of Irondequoit Bay, not daring
to
 		cross the sand bar. He proposes to destroy the Seneca Indians to the south. A
small
 		log enclosure is built and his boats are sunk so they will not blow away.   
Jul 12		Denonville marches his army southeast toward the Indian village of
Gannagaro
 		(Ganandogan).
Jul 13		In the midst of intense heat, 800 Seneca, forewarned, attack
Denonville's forces
 		- the Denonville Ambuscade. The Indians withdraw when the remaining French
 		forces come up. Casualties are moderate on both sides.     
Jul 14		Denonville enters Gannagaro, which the Indians have burned.   
Jul 15		The French under Tonty, Calliere and Vaudreuille destroy Seneca corn
collected at
 		their granary at Gahayanduk (Fort Hill at Ganondagan). The remaining Seneca
 		will all survive the winter.
Jul 19		The French destroy Totiakton (Rochester Junction).
Jul 20		The French destroy Gannounata (Lima-Avon). Denonville discovers a coat
of arms
 		           sent by British general Dongan claiming the area is English
territory.   
Jul 23		The French camp at three small lakes, todayÕs Mendon Ponds Park.    
Jul 24		Denonville's forces burn their log fort on the bay.    
Jul 26		Denonville departs from Irondequoit Bay, bound for  the Niagara area and
then to
 		          Montreal in August.
November	The entire Iroquois League allies itself with the English.

	State - Fortifications are erected at the future site of Fort Niagara.    **   
Johannes Van
 		Rensselaer dies, childless, leaving the patroonship of Rensselaerwyck clear
for
 		his nephew Killian.

1688
	City - Politician Leonard Lewis marries Elisabeth Hardebnbergh of Kingston.   
 	State - Fortifications erected last year at the future site of Fort Niagara
are dismantled.

1689
Apr 27		Albany learns that France has declared war on England.
Jun 1		Jacob Leisler overthrows New York CityÕ's deputy-governor Francis
Nicholson,
 		         seizes the colony's fort.
Aug 1		The Albany Convention is established for protection against a French
attack.   
September	Meeting with Mohawk chiefs at Albany, New England commissioners form
an
 		               alliance against the French, with the Five Nations.
Dec 11		Leisler seizes the entire colony of New York.

	State - Approximately 2250 Seneca inhabit the colony.
***MLS Online-An Internet BBS. (www.mlsonline.com) Focus: Family, Business &
Education. Voice Support: 716-454-5577
From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct  1 21:26:36 1996
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Date: Tue, 1 Oct 1996 21:31:25 -0400
Message-ID: <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: NYS & Nat'l Archives  - help please!
content-length: 925

In a message dated 96-10-01 17:28:05 EDT, Julie writes:

>Consider the Source may be previewed on-line at
>http://www.sara.nysed.gov/services/teachers/ctspromo.htm.

Thank you Julie! I found this site (and http://www.sara.nysed.gov) to be very
informative.

I am looking for a repository that may be inposession of any records that
pertain to entry at what used to be the "Port of Buffalo" or "Buffalo
Harbor." 
If the SARA is in posession of them, I am unaware of this. Does anyone know
if the National Archives that cover NY are in receipt of any such records (if
they exsist)?  These would be early records - between 1830 and the 1880 time
frame.
My best guess is that they may (if they exist) contain information on early
English and German settlers as well as the first Polish immigrants to Erie
County.  

Any thoughts or information are appreciated.

Kathi White
TreeSearch Research
http://feefhs.org/frg/frg-tsr.html
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Date: Wed, 2 Oct 1996 10:04:18 -0400 (EDT)
From: "Michael D. Bathrick" <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: (no subject)
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FYI - Last night I faxed and emailed everyone on the list Karen sent out 
the other day regarding this situation.  First thing this AM John Buono,
executive director of DASNY, called me at home regarding my fax and 
basically called Karen a 'disgruntled archaeologist' who had lost her 
job.  He also claimed that DASNY was doing everything in their power to
check out the site - however, most of the site is not even on DASNY's 
property.

I'm not trying to defend either side.  I did think, however, that y'all 
would want to know what DASNY said and did.

Michael Bathrick


On Tue, 1 Oct 1996, Karen Hartgen wrote:

> The 17th century archeological site in Albany, New York was backfilled yesterday.  Immediate action is necessary!! Construction will begin soon and this site will be lost forever.  Please contact the Govenor, John Buono, Commissioner Castro, and your legislators about this outrage.
> 
From [log in to unmask] Wed Oct  2 21:41:47 1996
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Message-Id: <[log in to unmask]>
From: "Chris Andrle" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives  - help please!
Date: Wed, 2 Oct 1996 21:45:11 -0400
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I don't understand this. How could Buffalo be a port of entry for
immigration
from anywhere except Canada during this time period? And it seems
unlikely that many people would go east from Canada to New York
when the general movement was west from the East coast. The port of
entry for Buffalo immigrants I think is almost always New York City, via
either the canal or the railroad. I have been working on family history in
Buffalo for many years and have not seen any reference to records of this
type for Buffalo, but I would welcome information on any possible new
sources for Buffalo research.

Chris Andrle
[log in to unmask]

> I am looking for a repository that may be inposession of any records that
> pertain to entry at what used to be the "Port of Buffalo" or "Buffalo
> Harbor." 
> If the SARA is in posession of them, I am unaware of this. Does anyone
know
> if the National Archives that cover NY are in receipt of any such records
(if
> they exsist)?  These would be early records - between 1830 and the 1880
time
> frame.
> My best guess is that they may (if they exist) contain information on
early
> English and German settlers as well as the first Polish immigrants to
Erie
> County.  
> 
> Any thoughts or information are appreciated.
> 

From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct  3 09:21:18 1996
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Date: Thu, 3 Oct 1996 09:18:19 +0700
To: [log in to unmask]
From: [log in to unmask] (Societe d'histoire de Longueuil)
Subject: Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives  - help please!
content-length: 2072

I only know many European immigrants to the west came through the St.
Lawrence river during the 19th century. I don't have the numbers in mind
but I remember that most immigrants only made a short stop in Quebec
harbour on their way to Upper Canada and the inner continent.

>I don't understand this. How could Buffalo be a port of entry for
>immigration
>from anywhere except Canada during this time period? And it seems
>unlikely that many people would go east from Canada to New York
>when the general movement was west from the East coast. The port of
>entry for Buffalo immigrants I think is almost always New York City, via
>either the canal or the railroad. I have been working on family history in
>Buffalo for many years and have not seen any reference to records of this
>type for Buffalo, but I would welcome information on any possible new
>sources for Buffalo research.
>
>Chris Andrle
>[log in to unmask]
>
>> I am looking for a repository that may be inposession of any records that
>> pertain to entry at what used to be the "Port of Buffalo" or "Buffalo
>> Harbor."
>> If the SARA is in posession of them, I am unaware of this. Does anyone
>know
>> if the National Archives that cover NY are in receipt of any such records
>(if
>> they exsist)?  These would be early records - between 1830 and the 1880
>time
>> frame.
>> My best guess is that they may (if they exist) contain information on
>early
>> English and German settlers as well as the first Polish immigrants to
>Erie
>> County.
>>
>> Any thoughts or information are appreciated.
>>

                                                         Jean Martin, Ph.D.
                                                         490, Desaulniers #1
                                                         St-Lambert (Quebec)
                                                         CANADA
                                                         J4P 1N6
                                                          Tel:514-671-4209
                                                          [log in to unmask]


From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct  3 09:30:01 1996
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Date: Thu, 3 Oct 1996 09:34:02 -0400 (EDT)
From: "Christopher G. Ricciardi" <[log in to unmask]>
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Hi,

	My server bounced this letter back to me, so I'm sending it to the
list again...sorry if this did get through the first time.

	I am looking for information regarding New York State Historical 
Societies.  Does anyone know if there is a listing of all the local
societies along with their address and possible phone numbers?  I am
working on a project that involves local historical groups and am having
trouble locating them.

	Thanks for any advice/help you can offer.

Chris Ricciardi


From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct  3 09:57:07 1996
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Date: Thu, 3 Oct 1996 10:01:57 -0400
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To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives - help please!
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In a message dated 96-10-03 08:58:39 EDT, Chris Andrle writes:

>I don't understand this. How could Buffalo be a port of entry for
>immigration from anywhere except Canada during this time period? 
>And it seems unlikely that many people would go east from Canada
> to New York when the general movement was west from the East coast. 

I didn't specify in my posting where they came from! - Canada or anywhere
else for that matter!  They were not heading east from Buffalo, they were
heading west or simply remaining in Buffalo. I will quote from "America's
Crossroads, Buffalo's Canal Street/Dante Place" pg. 24:
"A total number of 61,485 passengers passed through Buffalo Harbor in 1833,
almost all of them (42,956) boarding lake vessels heading west from this
port."

And from "The Making of an American Pluralism" (Dr. David Gerber) pg 5:
Buffalo would soon be recognized as "The great natural gateway between East
and West" between 1826-1837, the number of vessels ARRIVING there increased
from 418 to 3,955."

So, my question is, Do any manifests of sort, exist for people who arrived at
the Port of Buffalo regardless of where they came from or where they were
heading? It could very well be they simply don't exist and that is why nobody
knows of them?! :)


Kathi White
[log in to unmask]
From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct  3 13:40:45 1996
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Date: Thu, 03 Oct 1996 13:47:52 -0400
From: Phil Lord <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject:  Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives  - help please! -Reply
content-length: 1274

This question of immigrant entry into the US via Buffalo, coming off Lake
Ontario, is an interesting one, and if supported by evidence, would add a
good deal of dimension to the story of early 19th century transport and
settlement.

Once the Erie Canal was open [1825] it would be hard to imagine anyone
not taking advantage of the relatively easy passage via the Hudson and
the canal to points west.

However, one must also recognize that there was a transport corridor to
Upper Canada via the St. Lawrence that, to those going to Canada, was
as inviting, perhaps, as any other.

One may imagine that families or individuals might throw in their lot with
passengers bound for Canada, for one reason or another, and yet have
it in mind to end up in the US at points west of Rochester. 

But it is also hard to imagine that this was an occurrence of any
considerable scope.

Certainly in the preceding half century, people from all over the world
entered the US at the western terminus of the waterway corridor, then
Oswego. Those going west usually kept to the lake, then to Niagara, then
Detroit, and on.

Does the question arise from some data in hand? Or is this just a
conceptual inquiry... a "what if" kind of search?

Philip Lord, Jr.
NYS Museum
[log in to unmask]

From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct  3 14:28:48 1996
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Kathi;  If you get an answer to your question about people passing through
the port of Buffalo, please let me know.  I've got some mystery families
that probably came through there ca/1804 going to NE Ohio.  I have tried to
find something through the Fairport Harbor Museum in Lake Co.,OH.  They
didn't have a thing before the 1860's.  I wonder if there is a Marine or
Naval Museum in Buffalo.

Sandy McSpadden.

From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct  3 20:57:25 1996
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To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Port of Buffalo arrivals?
content-length: 1279

In a message dated 96-10-03 17:27:00 EDT,Phillip Lord writes:

>This question of immigrant entry into the US via Buffalo, coming off Lake
>Ontario, is an interesting one, and if supported by evidence, would add a
>good deal of dimension to the story of early 19th century transport and
>settlement.
>Does the question arise from some data in hand? Or is this just a
>conceptual inquiry... a "what if" kind of search?

Thank you for your informative reply....  I don't know if quoting material I
found in several books is considered "data in hand".  I suppose the
conceptual query is --> If this was a port with *all  these* people landing
here, where any form of records kept upon arrival. ?
Many historical books I have been reading on Buffalo continue to refer to
this port and all the immigrants that passed through it. The fact they they
arrived here seems to be well documented but who were they?    I am not so
much concerned with where they were going or how they even got there  (but
sincerely appreciate the history lesson) as I am with determining whether
documentation exists.   I don't mean to open a can of worms, I am just
baffled by this whole scenario and am trying to get to the bottom of it!

Thank you very much!
Kathi White
http://feefhs.org/frg/frg-tsr.html
From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct  3 21:19:00 1996
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From: "Chris Andrle" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives - help please!
Date: Thu, 3 Oct 1996 21:22:23 -0400
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There is a marine museum in Buffalo:

Lower Lakes Marine Historical Society
101 Great Arrow Avenue
Buffalo, New York

However, I have used their research library and don't believe they have
anything relating to this problem. In my experience, there are no records
of immigrants arriving or leaving Buffalo, whether by train, canal or lake.
If you don't pick them up in the New York City passenger lists, then 
you probably aren't going to find them.

I would be happy if someone could contradict this.

Chris Andrle
[log in to unmask]

> Kathi;  If you get an answer to your question about people passing
through
> the port of Buffalo, please let me know.  I've got some mystery families
> that probably came through there ca/1804 going to NE Ohio.  I have tried
to
> find something through the Fairport Harbor Museum in Lake Co.,OH.  They
> didn't have a thing before the 1860's.  I wonder if there is a Marine or
> Naval Museum in Buffalo.
> 
> Sandy McSpadden.
From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct  3 22:03:11 1996
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Date: Thu, 03 Oct 1996 17:53:20 -0700
From: "David G. Nutter, AICP" <[log in to unmask]>
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Organization: NUTTER Associates Inc.
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During the recent very excellent documentary on the Potato Blight in
Ireland, there was discussion of an island in the St. Lawrence, east of
Montreal I believe, that became a place of quarantine for Irish refugees
fleeing the famine.

I wonder if it may be possible that Irish emigrants seeking to flee the
famine, along this route, could have come on to Buffalo via Lake Ontario
and, perhaps, the Welland Canal.

-- 
David G. Nutter                         Rochester, NY 14618-4136
Nutter Associates Inc.                  Tel  1-716-271-7940
Community Planners                      Fax 1-716-244-6836
240 Allens Creek Road                   [log in to unmask]
From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct  4 08:15:43 1996
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From: Phil Lord <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject:  Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives - help please! -Reply
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If anyone has accounts of families going west FROM Buffalo prior to
1830, and it is not clear that they came up the St. Lawrence, I would be
most interested, as my research focuses on the inland waterway route
to Lake Ontario, and all points west, prior to that date, and I might be able
to shed some light.

Philip Lord, Jr.
NYS Museum
[log in to unmask]

From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct  4 09:33:20 1996
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Date: Fri, 4 Oct 1996 09:38:11 -0400 (EDT)
From: Rohit T Aggarwala <[log in to unmask]>
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To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives  - help please! -Reply
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I have heard from many friends, colleagues, and former professors of the
Canadian persuasion that the St. Lawrence did send many immigrants t the
U.S. via Buffalo in the 19th c.  Although it is true that the Erie Canal
was the main gateway, British and Canadian authorities sought to turn
British emigrants from the U.S. to Canada, and so induced shipping
companies to offer low rates (I think there may even have been a direct
subsidy for this) for immigrants from British ports to Montreal.  Many
would-be emigrants to the U.S. took advantage of these lower rates and got
themselves from Montreal to the U.S.  One professor of mine has suggested
that this generally overlooked immigration path may affect total U.S.
immigration numbers by 10% or more.

Further, it's important not to overlook the large numbers of Canadians who
were emigrating to the U.S., who would have been more likely to enter at
Buffalo than anywhere else, at least until the Great Western Railway was
built in the 1850s.

From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct  4 19:17:31 1996
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From: James Folts <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject:  No passenger arrival records for Buffalo
content-length: 729

Several recent inquiries and comments have concerned passenger
arrival records for the port of Buffalo during the 19th century.  The Guide
to Genealogical Research in the National Archives (Washington:  1982)
provides a table of "Available Passenger Arrival Records," arranged by
state and port of entry (pp. 48-56).  Following are the available
passenger arrival records for New York:

New York City
Original lists, 1820-1897
Copies or abstracts, 1820-1874

Oswegatchie (i.e. Ogdensburg)
1821-1823

Rochester
1866

Sag Harbor
1829, 1832, 1834

No other New York ports of entry are listed; apparently no ship
passenger records for Buffalo survive.

Jim Folts
Co-Moderator, NYHIST-L
New York State Archives
[log in to unmask]

From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct  4 19:21:55 1996
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To: [log in to unmask]
Subject:  Directory of Historical Organizations
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Several recent postings to NYHIST-L have concerned the availability of
information on historical societies and other historical organizations in
New York.  On the suggestion of a NYHIST-L subscriber (George18) I
would advise others interested in this topic to consult the current edition
of the Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and
Canada, published by the American Association for State and Local
History, 172 Second Avenue North, Suite 202, Nashville, TN 37201.

A Directory of New York State Museums andHistorical Societies was
published by the New York State Education Department, Office of
Cultural Education, Albany, NY 12230, in 1987-88.  The publication was
issued in pamphlet format, in separate parts, for the various regions of
the state.  This directory should be available in many libraries throughout
the state.

Jim Folts
Co-Moderator, NYHIST-L
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From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct  4 19:23:35 1996
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Subject: Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives - help please!
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Chris;  If there isn't info on immigrants, how about ship's passenger lists
of people going from NY to ports such as those in Ohio in the early 1800's?
In my research I found a woman's notes on the ship carrying one of my
families from Buffalo ca/1804, and I'm wondering where she got this.

Sandy McSpadden.

From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct  4 22:11:48 1996
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Subject: Re: Buffalo replies
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Thank to you all of you who replied to my query about the Port of Buffalo.  I
also believe, that this pattern of migration is overlooked.   If I can get my
hands on more citations regarding numbers, I will surley pass them along and
see what becomes of it.

I'm not trying to rewrite history, just clear it up a bit :)

Thank you!
Kathi White


From [log in to unmask] Sat Oct  5 18:52:31 1996
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Date: Sun, 01 Oct 1995 12:38:51 -0400
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Announcing the Governors of NYS page located at
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nygenweb/governors.htm
This is part of the NYGenweb project, and lists
all the governors of NY from Clinton to Pataki.

It has links to other sites that pertain to the 
governors when I could find them. I would like to
put links to papers that people have written (be they
adults or students) that pertain to the governors.
The paper wouldn't have to be already on, I could 
provide space for it.

Please check this out, I would welcome any feedback
and suggestions for bettering the site.

Thanks!

Kim Harris Myers
NY Genweb coordinator
From [log in to unmask] Mon Oct  7 13:50:06 1996
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From: PATRICK MCGREEVY <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Message-Id: <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives  - help please! -Reply
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      Regarding the possible importance of Buffalo as a port of entry,
J. Finlay and D. Sprague in their classic book "The Structure of Canadian
History" stress the huge immigration to Canada.  60,000 arrived from
Ireland alone between 1845-48.  Nearly one-third perished within a year.
Many left Canada for the USA because Canadian employers refused to hire
them.  There was in fact tremendous discrimination toward them.  Ontario
was a bastian of the Orangemen.  There was apparently, a sorting of
can

Canada's immigrants: many who felt they didn't fit in, continued on to
the USA.  I assume Buffalo (as well as Detroit) would be the major
port of entry for these immigrants.  And it was at Buffalo that Irish
soldiers, fresh from the Civil War, invaded Upper Canada in 1866, an
event that helped to precipitate Canada's independence the following year.
Patrick McGreevy
Clarion University
[log in to unmask]
From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct  8 08:44:19 1996
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Message-Id: <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Tue, 08 Oct 96 08:48:45 -0400
From: Karen Hartgen <[log in to unmask]>
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Subject: RE: DASNY DOWNTOWN ALBANY
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Charles Gehring, Director of the New Netherland Project provided the following remarks regarding the DASNY site in Albany (Beverwyck).  " Once again Albany has been confronted or maybe even embarrassed by its past.  Recently excavations at the site of the future Dormitory Authority building has uncovered evidence of Albany's Dutch past.  One year after Petrus Stuyvesant proclaimed the jurisdiction of the village of Beverwijck north of Fort Orange in 1652 building lots were let out in the area of what would become the north gate of the stockade.  The location is significant because the houses along what is now Broadway would have been active in the Indian trade coming down from the north.  One of the houses was a brewery owned by Frans Barentsz Pastoor who was important in the Indian trade and also a prominent magistrate on the governing board of the village.  The site promised to yield a rich treasure of artifacts from the seventeenth century:  goods used in the Indian trade!
 , household goods revealing the lifestyle and standard of living of the inhabitants, and the first chance to uncover a period brewery.  The city and state should rejoice at such possibilities.  No other place in the Northeast has such a rich and diverse heritage.  Albany should exploit the riches from the past rather than view them as a hindrance to development.  Cities less rich in historic potential than Albany are finding that tourism is becoming their primary industry.  Albany should promote its historic treasures as its most valuable resource rather than continue to cover them up.

Charles Gehring
Director, New Netherland Project
From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct  8 23:29:04 1996
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Subject: NYNY 1690-1694
Date: Tue,  8 Oct 96 23:24:58 EST
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1690
Jan 22		A council of Iroquois Indians at Onondaga renews the tribe's allegiance
to England
 		and promises aid against the French.
Feb 9		French and Indian forces lead by the Comte de Frontenac massacre
Schenectady
 		settlers.
Apr 11		Massachusetts calls a special meeting of the United Colonies of New
England. Two
 		companies of troops are dispatched to Albany.
May 1		An intercolonial congress meets in New York City to plan attacks on
Montr#al and
 		Qu#bec. They also discuss the establishment of provincial laws.
Jun 5		The Council of Virginia decides to send Colonel Cuthbert Potter to New
England to
 		report on the aftermath of New York's Leisler uprising.
Jul 22		Potter arrives in New York City.
August		Fitz-John Randolph leads a colonial force to Montr#al by way of Lake
Champlain
 		but is forced to turn back at Lake George for lack of support.
Aug 23		Potter sails for Long Island from Newport, Rhode Island, on his return
trip.
Aug 30		Potter reaches Flushing, New York. He hears that governor Jacob Milborne
may
 		have him searched and he departs.

	City population Ń 3,900.    **    The city council creates the position of
Inviters to
 		Funerals. Richard Chapman and Cornadus Vandor Beeck are the first to fill the
 		office. Hogs are to be kept penned, and poisonous and noxious weeds are to be
kept
 		cleared by householders.

1691
Mar 17	English governor Henry Sloughter arrives in New York City, has Leisler
 		arrested.
May 13	New York's first assembly as a royal colony reenacts 1683's Charter of
Liberties 		and goes on record as pro-representative government.
May 16	Rebellion leader Jacob Leisler and###  son-in-law  Jacob Milborne are
executed.
Oct 1		New York colonyÕs Albany County is confirmed.

	City- Surveyors begin laying out streets and lots. The council votes a four
shilling per
 		week allowance to Top-Knot Betty, another woman and two children, as charity
 		cases.    **    John Lawrence is appointed mayor for the year.

1692
Oct 21		New York governor Benjamin Fletcher is commissioned governor of
Pennsylvania
 		by William and Mary.

	City - Abraham De Peyster is appointed mayor, for the first of three
consecutive
 		annual terms.
	Massachusetts - Nantucket and MarthaÕs Vineyard, purchased from the Earl of
Sterling
 		by the Earl of York, and under New YorkÕs jurisdiction as Dukes County, are
 		granted to Massachusetts.

1693
Apr 14		William Bradford establishes the first printing press in New York City,
on
 		Hanover Square.
Oct 4		Recently arrived English governor Benjamin Fletcher convenes colonial
deputies
 		to plan for war against the French. Few plans get made.

1694
Aug 15		Colonial delegates meeting in Albany sign a treaty with the Iroquois, to
keep the
 		Indians from siding with the French.

	City - Charles Lodwik is appointed mayor for this year, and again for next.   
**     Ships
 		bound for the city begin taking on their pilots at New JerseyÕs Sandy Hook
Bar.


***MLS Online-An Internet BBS. (www.mlsonline.com) Focus: Family, Business &
Education. Voice Support: 716-454-5577
From [log in to unmask] Wed Oct  9 13:25:40 1996
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From: David William Voorhees <[log in to unmask]>
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Subject: re Albany dig
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I was informed this morning that the Dormitory Authority of the State of
New York is planning to move rapidly ahead in eradicating the
archeological site recently discovered in downtown Albany.  The site is of
the utmost historic importance, containing over 400 years of materials,
including Native American.  Karen Hartgen's archeological report, which I
have read, reveals an astonishing amount of materials from the
seventeenth- and eighteenth centuries.  This is a rare opportunity to
study and understand the origins and development of New York's culture
from its inception.  New York was the point of entry for most immigrants
to America over the past 300 years, and it was to New York's culture to
which they were first exposed.  This can be readily seen in the widespread
American adoption of Santa Claus (Sinter Klaas), the baby shower
(kindermaal), and numerous other customs of New York origins.  The Albany
site provides a unique opportunity to understand the development of
American civilization...   It is imperative that all efforts be made to halt
the destruction of this valuable historic site until further study can be
made.

David William Voorhees




From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct  8 08:53:10 1996
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Date: Tue, 08 Oct 96 08:57:43 -0400
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The merits of preserving and studying the recently discovered
archaeological site in downtown Albany will be readily recognized by
historians, scholars, and the general public.  They may well, however,
escape politicians and businessmen, whose main concern is a quick return
on the dollar.  The Albany archeaological site could make a great tourist
attraction and anchor for downtown Albany, something that that city badly
needs.  Past governmental policies have virtually destroyed the city, cut
off its views of the river, and left vast areas of parking lots for
businesses which no longer exist.  That Albany is virtually a ghost town
save for the state offices is readily apparent to anyone who walks the
city's streets.  The Albany site could bring in thousands of tourists and
their dollars, much as Jamestown, Va., does, giving a boost to a badly
sagging economy, while the State Dormitory Office Building, while not only
destroying another valuable historic site, will bring in only 300 state
workers who will flee the downtown area come 5 o'clock and will add
virtually nothing to the economy of the region.

David William Voorhees
editor, Papers of Jacob Leisler
        de Halve Maen


From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct  4 19:18:32 1996
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Date: Fri, 4 Oct 1996 19:15:33 +0700
To: [log in to unmask]
From: [log in to unmask] (Societe d'histoire de Longueuil)
Subject:  Re: Buffalo as a Port of Entry
content-length: 1515

"During the recent very excellent documentary on the Potato Blight in
Ireland, there was discussion of an island in the St. Lawrence, east of
Montreal I believe, that became a place of quarantine for Irish refugees
fleeing the famine.

I wonder if it may be possible that Irish emigrants seeking to flee the
famine, along this route, could have come on to Buffalo via Lake Ontario
and, perhaps, the Welland Canal.

--
David G. Nutter                         Rochester, NY 14618-4136
Nutter Associates Inc.                  Tel  1-716-271-7940
Community Planners                      Fax 1-716-244-6836
240 Allens Creek Road                   [log in to unmask]"


The place was called Grosse Ile or Ile de la Quarantaine and is situated a
few kilometers below Quebec Harbour. The Canadian Government is setting up
a memorial park there which was inaugurated by the President of Ireland a
couple of years ago. You could take a look at Parks Canada's Website:

http://parkscanada.pch.gc.ca/parks/main_f.htm

                                                         Jean Martin, Ph.D.
                                                         490, Desaulniers #1
                                                         St-Lambert (Quebec)
                                                         CANADA
                                                         J4P 1N6
                                                          Tel:514-671-4209
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From [log in to unmask] Wed Oct  9 21:43:11 1996
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From: "Chris Andrle" <[log in to unmask]>
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Subject: Re: NYS & Nat'l Archives - help please!
Date: Wed, 9 Oct 1996 21:45:55 -0400
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Sandy,

So far as I know, there was no authority or office in Buffalo with any
responsibility for recording the names of people arriving or departing
at the port of Buffalo. The only requirement was the purchase of a
ticket and of course the shipping lines had no reason to record
information about their passengers.

The newspapers do report the names of ship arrivals and departures
but I don't believe there were any newspapers as early as 1804. I don't
know anywhere that that type of information could be found. Buffalo
was a very small village in 1804. Maybe the information about the
ship was recorded on some family document or remembered through
word of mouth within the family.

Chris Andrle
[log in to unmask]  
> 
> Chris;  If there isn't info on immigrants, how about ship's passenger
lists
> of people going from NY to ports such as those in Ohio in the early
1800's?
> In my research I found a woman's notes on the ship carrying one of my
> families from Buffalo ca/1804, and I'm wondering where she got this.
> 
> Sandy McSpadden.
From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct 11 08:19:58 1996
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From: Phil Lord <[log in to unmask]>
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Subject:  Starks Knob
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I have an intern doing research on a hill called Starks Knob just north of
Schuylerville in Saratoga County.

He has made the initial survey of sources, but the trail has gone cold for
details beyond some ambiguous references to it being used by General
Stark as a gun position during the Battle of Saratoga [or maybe it was
another hill nearby?].

Anyway, one of the dimensions of his internship is to understand how
the different sources of data can be used to support a research project;
one being use of listservs such as this.

If anyone has suggestions to pass on to him in this regard, please let me
know. His name is Marc Feinstein.

Philip Lord, Jr.
Historical Survey
NYS Museum
Albany, NY 12230
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From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct 15 14:37:53 1996
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NEW YORK ARCHAEOLOGICAL COUNCIL, INC. SEEKS CONSIDERATION OF HISTORIC RESOURCES DISCOVERED ON BROADWAY IN ALBANY

Albany, New York - October 15, 1996 - The New York State Archaeological Council (NYAC) today commenced a legal proceeding against the New York State Dormitory Authority to protect the significant historic resources discovered on its Broadway office project site in downtown Albany. The artifacts discovered are from the 17th Century Dutch stockaded settlement known as Beverwijck immediately north of Fort Orange. The village of Beverwijck was first proclaimed by Petrus Stuyvesant in 1652. Other significant 18th and 19th century resources are also on site.
   
NYAC is seeking to compel the Dormitory Authority to comply with the State Environmental Quality Review Act and the State Historic Preservation Act and to explore ways in which these significant historic resources can be protected. Compliance with these requirements would result in an evaluation of the significant adverse impacts to the resources and a thorough exploration of the possible alternatives or mitigation measures. Public participation is a critical component of this process which must make information concerning the project, its impacts and mechanisms for impact mitigation available for public review and comment.

Charles Cobb, President of the NYAC, stated: "Our society benefits by the study and ducumentation of these significant cultural resources. The Beverwijck is a unique site in the state and in the country. It represents the last remaining opportunity to explore and preserve our heritage and understanding of an important period in the history of European settlement and the early interaction with Native American People. The project area should be listed on the State and 
National Registers of Historic Places."

Cobb stated, "NYAC felt constrained to act at this time due to the imminent threat to these valuable resources by the commencement of DASNY's on-site construction activities. We would welcome the opportunity to meet with the involved agencies to reach agreement on measures to mitigate any adverse impacts to the resources. We believe that early consideration of historic resources should be an integral component of project development within the downtown Albany revitalization area so that these projects may proceed in a timely way."

The archaeological significance of the site was first investigated by Karen Hartgen of Hartgen Archeological Associates, Inc. during an initial survey of the project site. NYAC is being represented by Carl G. Dworkin of Guilderland and Marc S. Gerstman of Poestenkill.

For further information, please contact NYAC at 607-777-2487.
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EB Odds & Ends
A Newsletter of Eagles Byte Historic Research
October 1996, No. 13

All Too Short a Date

	Blame it on the Displeasure of the Deity? That was a popular theory, at least
in 1816.
	Blame it on the barycenter? Perhaps.
	Before I started my research for this article I had never heard of the
b##arycenter. It's described as being the center of mass of the Solar System,
and supposedly the sun, with all of us in orbitary tow, loops around this
theoretical point in space every 10 to 20 years. But there doesnÕt seem to be a
reliable schedule for the Astronomical Transit System.
	Apparently there are occasions when the sun falls just short in its loop and
goes back and gets it right. Admirable!
	This example of celestial loop-the-loop is known as the Solar Retrograde
Theory. If it holds true, the SRT could account for a few deviations in the
workings of our own planet. The claim is made that when the sun makes its extra
loop, sunspot frequency decreases while volcanic activity steps up. And in
recent years volcanoes have been taking the blame for making major changes in 
our planetÕs atmosphere; perhaps even dinosauricide.
	In the late 1600s and early 1700s Earth was treated to the Maunder Minimum, a
period of fifty to seventy-five years which created the "Little Ice Age". It was
not unusual at that time for London's River Thames to  freeze over.
	Our most recent SRT occurred in April of 1990. The volcanic Mount Pinatubo was
in the news and last winter was unusually cold and prolonged over parts of North
 America. So there might be something to the theory. 
	I make no claims either way, but the SRT theory is applied most often to the
years 1815-1817.
	On April 5th, 1815, Dutch East Indies residents near Sumatra's Mount Tambora
volcano felt shock waves beneath their feet and under the keels of their boats.
Six days later there were further shocks and the next day Tambora erupted,
pouring fifty cubic kilometers of ash skyward as high as 43 kilometers, blotting
out the sun. Then conditions seemingly returned to normal, except for sunsets
that were far more spectacular than normal. And the fact that the average
temperature of the globe began dropping, eventually decreasing  an average of
one degree Celsius.
	September 23rd brought a hurricane, "the September Gale of 1815", to New
England. Memorable but not all that much out of the ordinary. Then on December
2nd, the Hudson River froze over. Also a little out of the ordinary. It was
going to be a cold winter. Perhaps that accounted for a bit of inflation around
my part of New York State as the price for Genesee River wheat reached a high of
$15 a barrel. This area wasnÕt heavily populated then and everyone seems to have
survived the ensuing winter, at least as well as farmers along a frontier could
expect to do. Spring, as always, was anticipated .
	Things donÕt always come to those who wait. The climate warmed and crops across
New York and New England were planted. And then, on June 6th, a  cold wave swept
from Canada to Virginia. Laundry that had been laid out to dry on the grass at
Plymouth, Connecticut, was found frozen stiff. The Berkshires, New Hampshire and
Vermont received ten inches of snow.
	Five days later the area "wahmed up considerable." Then the cold shifted west
and a blizzard slammed the Cleveland area on the 17th. On July 9th, a killing
frost settled over northern New England.
	Europe wasnÕt receiving the meteorological blows that were falling on North
America, but colder weather was having an adverse effect on crops across the
continent. Britain seems to have escaped the worst effects, perhaps due to the
Gulf Stream. The Naval Chronicles reported average temperatures falling from an
average 47.56 degrees for the period between the first of the year and the 18th
of July in 1814, and an average 50.73 for the same period in the following year,
to a period average of 20.25 in 1816. It also reported, "The rain this year has
been very frequently attended by cold winds." As the summer wore on the
Chronicles reported, "Rain and high wind on 30, 31 Aug. Frost on morning of 2
Sep. Wheat harvest is getting on rapidly, in some places it has finished. Grain
crop in general is it`s usual size, and in most places there is a good average
crop."
	France was not as sanguine. Crops were not coming along well there and on
August 7th the government forbade grain exports.
	Two weeks later damaging frosts again struck New England, and on the 30th they
occurred a third time; Cleveland reeled under a second blizzard. The following
day the ship James , sailing near Canada's Grand Banks spotted a mile-long
iceberg, and snow fell near London.
	While some were feeling the cold wind of God's Wrath in their faces and down
their chimneys, others were seeking more understandable causes or preparing for
anticipated food shortages. On October 30th the Philadelphia Society for the
Promotion of Agriculture, the country's first farmers' group, authorized a study
of the past summer's weather in the U. S. And on the 20th of November the French
government began importing grain. Famine began stalking Bavaria, lasting there
for over two years.
	1817 brought moderating weather and scattered relief, although grain riots
broke out in Fauville, France, on January 17th (authorities there must have
worriedly recollected events of the Revolution.) On the 26th, Swiss churches
declared a day of special collections to alleviate famine conditions.
	But Spring did arrive and soon the nightmare was ending for most of the
affected regions. On August 5th, the German city of Ulm celebrated the end of
its food shortage with a thanksgiving. Western New York State seems to have felt
a positive affect - during the last three months of the year, 5,000 bushels of
flour were shipped out of the Genesee River to Montr#al, and the open boat
Troyer brought Buffalo the first flour from the west. Another year would see
Rochester exporting 26,000 barrels of flour.
	There are a few coincidental events during the period, having to do with
weather, religion and food, that are interesting to note:

	1816. The first religious newspaper in the U. S. the Boston Recorder, is
published. In California, Boston sailor Thomas Doakes jumped ship at San Juan
Bautista, the first U. S. citizen to settle in California. (And perhaps the
first snowbird). New York City made five shipments of ice to the South, Asia and
South America.
	1817. On February 14th, a soup kitchen opened in New York City. And on March
4th, James Monroe became the first president to be inaugurated outdoors.

	"Eighteen hundred and froze to death" - "The Year without a Summer" - was over.
	Shakespeare had then been dead for over two centuries, but he may have summed
1816 up best in one of his sonnets when he wrote:

"Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And Summer's lease hath all too short a date;"


PEARL OF AN URL

	The data from the Naval Chronicles in the above article from was generously
provided, on request, by Michael Phillips of Plymouth, England. Mike maintains a
page for England's Plymouth Naval Base Museum, as well as other links.

	The Plymouth Naval Base Museum page contains, among other documents, extracts
from George Sallet's autobiography of an U. S. destroyer sailor throughout the
Pacific War; the story of Graham Island, a new island appearing in the Sicilian
Channel in the ealy 1830s; the 1882 wreck of the Douro; extracts from the Naval
Chronicle between 1799 and 1816; and exploits of British Submarine commanders in
the Dardenalles in 1914 and 1915. You can also link to Royal Navy pictures from
1898. From there on you can access "A page of useful information for readers of
naval history" and follow strands of the web to an Index to Pictures of U. S.
Ships from Revolutionary War to 1941 (via gopher); a guided tour around the USS
Kittyhawk; a data base containing more than 50,000 wrecks at Northern Maritime
Research; and North American Maritime Museums.
	You can also link from the Plymouth page to The World Ship Society and The
Algerines Association, an organization "formed in 1984 to bring together in
mutual friendship those who served in the Algerine Class and other naval vessels
such as danlayers and minesweepers of other classes which served with them."
	So hoist anchor, click link and off you sail.

	Mike Phillips can be reached at: [log in to unmask]


CHRONOLOGY

What else was happening in the world of science and technology during the second
half of the 1810s. A search on "sci" turns up the following:

1815
Jan 14		Hearings begin before the New Jersey state legislature to determine
whether Robert Fulton or Nicholas Roosevelt invented the steamboat with vertical
wheels.
Jan 24		The postponed steamboat hearings resume.
Jan 27		Fulton testifies in his own behalf.
Feb 4		 John R. Livingston is granted his suit to have the New Jersey monopoly
act repealed - a narrow victory for Fulton.
Feb 23		Inventor Robert Fulton dies, in New York City, of pneumonia.
Feb 25		Fulton is buried in lower Manhattan.
Nov 23	Canada's first streetlamps are installed, in Montreal.

	Technology - A British patent costs 70 pounds.

1816
Jan 9		Sir Humphrey Davy's safety lamp for miners is successfully tested.
Jul 12		French philosopher M. Rudy lectures on sun spots, in Paris.
Sep 11		Optical glass manufacturer Carl Zeiss is born in Germany.
Dec 6		Eli Whitney marries the granddaughter of evangelist Jonathan Edwards.

	       Baltimore, Maryland, becomes the first U. S. city lit by gas.
         Boats - The steamer Chancellor Livingston, the last steamboat built to
Fulton's specifications, goes into service on the Hudson River.
       	England - Charles Babbage is elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society.  
**    John Loudon McAdam devises a new method of road surfacing.

1817
	Geology - William Maclure's Observations on the Geology of the United States. 
	Law - The U. S. Supreme Court rules, in Lowell v. Lewis , that an invention
need only have utility, not be more useful than those already existing.
	Technology - Richard Roberts devises a metal planing machine, although he's not
the first to do so.

1818
	Benjamin Silliman founds The American Journal of Science, the earliest
scientific periodical.
	German physiologist Emil du Bois-Reymond is born in Berlin.

1819
	Agriculture - Secretary of the Treasury T. H. Crawford instructs U. S. consuls
in foreign countries to collect agricultural samples and learn of agricultural
inventions.
	Food - Vermont's John Conant invents a cooking stove.    **    New York's Ezra
Daggett and Thomas Kensett begin canning fish.
	Technology - U. S. inventor Oliver Evans, 64, dies.
  Transportation - The Savannah completes her first voyage to Europe, using some
steam power.


TRIVIA
LAST MONTH:
You were asked for the last name of the Portuguese navigator who discovered the
Senegal River, in 1445. The answer is Lancarote.

THIS MONTH:
	In 1941 a writer published a novel featuring a meteorologist tracking a huge
weather disturbance as it crossed the U. S. The scientist was a bit eccentric;
he gave the storm a woman's name, not a common practice at the time. Name the
novel and its author.
	(The first person to e-mail me a correct answer by November 15th will receive a
free Eagles Byte chronology for any year of their choice)



EB SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY: (more detailed versions available)

Barrow, John D. & Silk, Joseph - The Left Hand of Creation: The Origin and
	Evolution of the Expanding Universe (New York, Oxford University Press, 
Bonfanti, Leo - New England Side Trips, Volume 1 (Pride Publications)
Burnell, Marcia - Heritage Above: A Tribute to MaineÕs Tradition of Weather
Vanes (Down East Books)
Cohen, I. Bernard - Album of Science: The Nineteenth Century (New York,
Scribners, 1978)
Copernicus, Nicholaus - On the Revolution of Heavenly Spheres (Amherst, New
York, Prometheus)
Flexner, Doris & Stuart - The PessimistÕs Guide to History (Avon, New York,
1992)
Harrington, C. R. - The Year Without a Summer? : World Climate in 1816 (Ottawa :
Canadian Museum of Nature, 1992)
Keppler, Johannes - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy AND Harmonies of the World
(Amherst, Prometheus)
Parton, Ethel - The Year Without a Summer, a Story of 1816 (1945)
ReaderÕs Digest - Living Earth Book of Wind and Weather (New York, Random House)
Stommel, Harry and Elizabeth - Volcano Weather : the Story of 1816, the Year
Without a Summer (1983)
Struik, Dirk J. - Yankee Science in the Making (New York, Dover)
Wagner, Ronald L. & Adler, Bill, Jr. - The Weather Sourcebook (Old Saybrook,
Connecticut)

* * *
	I hope, as we begin our second year of snooping around in the world's history,
that  you've enjoyed this issue of Odds & Ends.

	Christmas isnÕt far off. Consider an Eagles Byte timeline for the history lover
on your list, or for yourself. $3 for each year, by e-mail; $4, by snail mail. 

David Minor

[log in to unmask]
[log in to unmask]

© 1996 David Minor / Eagles Byte
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From [log in to unmask] Mon Oct 14 13:54:56 1996
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Subject: NYNY 1695-1699
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1695
	City - William Merritt is appointed mayor, anually through 1698.
	State - All remaining Renssalaerwyck grants revert to Killian van Renssalaer,
son of
 		Jeremiah.    **    The colonyÕs exports near 200,000 pounds sterling, just
about equalling imports.

1696
September	William Kidd leaves New York City in the Adventure Galley , with a
royal
 		commission to capture pirates.

	City - A Quaker meeting house is built on Green Street (Liberty Place).

1697
	City - Trinity Church is built.    **    Paid appointed firemen are used Ń the
first in the
 		colonies.
           	State - The Earl of Bellomant is made royal governor of the colony,
with instructions
 		to end the pirate trade.

1698
	City - Johannes De Peyster is appointed mayor.
	State - Approximately 1230 Senecas remain in the colony, down from nearly twice
the
 		number nine year ago, due to war and disease.

1699
Jul 6		William Kidd, having turned himself in to authorities, is charged with
piracy.

	City -A city hall is built, at Wall and Nassau Streets. The wall along the
former street is
 		demolished to allow room for expansion.    **    David Provost is appointed
 		mayor.
	State - Kingston settler Johannis Hardenbergh marries Catherine Rutsen, of
Ulster
 		County.

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is anybody there

From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct 22 12:58:04 1996
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Well my test question worked. I received a large number of answers
including a lot of smart ones from so-called friends.

Can anybody bring us up to date on the Dutch site and the Dormitory
authority controversy? 
Bill Evans

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Subject: NYNY 1700-1704
Date: Tue, 22 Oct 96 14:48:23 EST
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1700 
	City - The population reaches 5,000.    **    Isaac De Reimer is appointed
mayor.
	Religion - The Massachusetts General Court and New York State banish Roman
Catholic
 		priests.

1701
	City - Thomas Noell is appointed mayor.   
	New York State adopts a policy of neutrality toward the Canadian French.

1702
Apr 17		East and West Jersey are united as a royal province by Queen Anne, under
the
 		governor of New York.

	City - Philip French is appointed mayor.

1703
Oct 14		City government moves from the Dutch Stadt Huys on Pearl Street to City
 		Hall on Wall Street.

	City - William Peartree is appointed mayor, serves to 1707.

1704
May 20	Queen AnneÕs patent of confirmation is awarded to New York State patroon
Killian
 		van Rennssalaer, son of Jeremiah.

	Education - French immigrant Elias Nau founds the first school for blacks in
New York
 		City.
	Literature - Mrs. Sarah Knight travels from Boston to New York and returns,
describing
 		her journey in The Private Journal . 

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From: "NATALIE A. NAYLOR" <[log in to unmask]>
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	Received your "test" mailing and have been getting communications.  

	I'd like to publicize through the New York State history list Hofstra's
Conference on Long Island Studies, Monday, November 18.  Eighteen speakers
featured on various topics ranging from Algonquian Peoples of Long Island
to Battle over Civil Rights on Long Island; also researching family history;
the Telefunken Station in West Sayville and Creating a Radio Museum...8:15-4. 
Registration is $30 if received by Nov. 11; $35 at the door--includes lunch. 
Request program from Long Island Studies Institute, Hofstra Univesity West
Campus, 619 Fulton Ave., Hempstead, NY 11550; 516-463-6411; e-mail:
[log in to unmask] (Natalie Naylor).



From [log in to unmask] Tue Oct 22 22:43:16 1996
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Date: Tue, 22 Oct 1996 19:24:09 -0600 (MDT)
From: "Karl A. Petersen" <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Canal Painting
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The canal painting I inquired about months ago has been identified. There 
is even a New York connection! It is a primitive oil copy of "Alone" by 
H. Vosberg, published as a lithograph supplement to Hemlandet by The 
Knapp Co., Lith., N.Y.

The oil copy had been rolled and smashed resulting in about six 
flaking vertical creases. During a garage sale, a customer spotted it 
and said, "I had a picture exactly like that once. I'm sure it's the 
same. It has those vertical lines just like that." Well, not very likely, 
I thought, since this was an oil painting and all. Six months later she 
was knocking on the door. She had gone to the rural town where she had 
put the picture on consignment after matting and frameing it, and it was 
still unsold. She brought it back, and, sure enough, it was a fine 
lithograph which had also been rolled and creased! We had to buy it just 
to have both ends of the story.

The "canal" barge and girl would have been a reminder of home for 
subscribers of Hemlandet which, I assume, was a Swedish language magazine 
around the turn of the century. The answers I got from my first posts 
suggested a European heritage, and here it is.

Thanks!

Karl.




From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct 24 09:52:26 1996
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Date: Thu, 24 Oct 1996 10:00:44 -0400
From: William Evans <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask], [log in to unmask]
Subject:  RE: Beverwyck archeological settlement -Reply
content-length: 1


From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct 24 09:14:06 1996
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Date: Thu, 24 Oct 96 09:18:58 -0400
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NYAC, the Dormitory Authority ,et. al. signed an agreement on Monday 10/21/96 that formally recognizes the historical significance of the archeological resources at  Broadway and Maiden Lane and accepts in concept a formal plan for archeological excavation which allows the construction to be coordinated with the archeology.  NYAC feels this is the first step in a continued dialog with OPRHP and DASNY to insure the treatment of this site as well as guaranteed  consideration of cultural resources in future projects.  NYAC is also pleased that this unique historic site will be fully investigated and the scientific findings will be shared with the professional community and the public.  This agreement represents the start of a continuing dialog among NYAC, OPRHP. and DASNY concerning this resource and historic preservation issues.  NYAC commends Karen Hartgen for her exceptional professionalism in investigation of the site and promoting the continued study of this valuable site !
 which reflects our Dutch heritage.

Major elements of the agreement include the following:
OPRHP will monitor the continued archeological excavation with inspections at least twice daily and more, if needed.  DASNY will issue regular public reports on the progress of the excavation.  The archeological consultant will continue to monitor the excavation of 119 ten by ten foot pile caps. The archeological consultant has the authority to control the rate and depth of excavation, to expand the pits and to order deeper excavation if its representatives feel the archeological features warrant such action.  DASNY will produce 100 copies of the final archeological report and 150 copies of a public booklet.

We have managed to provide for this unique site, but unfortunately did not force a legal decision.  As the archeology takes time and effects the construction schedule pressures will grow once again to  reduce the scope.  The historic and preservation communities should keep up their letter campaign to the Governor, Commissioner Castro and DASNY and your elected officials, the pressure to cut the archeology will grow as the construction schedule slips.  We must continue to be diligent and express our concerns for this site.

Contributions to the NYAC Legal Defense fund can be sent to Brian Nagel , NYAC Treasurer, Rochester Musuem, 657 East Avenue, Box 1480, Rochester, NY 14603-1480.  NYAC and the archeological community at large thank you for all you have done to support this cause.    
                                                        Thanks    Karen S. Hartgen
From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct 24 10:14:17 1996
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Date: Thu, 24 Oct 1996 10:22:39 -0400
From: William Evans <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject:  Leaving/signing off,etc
content-length: 330

To leave the list, do the following:

To:[log in to unmask]

no subject line

Message: UNSUBSCRIBE (OR SIGNOFF,IF YOU PREFER) NYHIST-L

You should receive confirmation.  The subscriber has to do this as you
are "talking" to a machine and telling it to undo what it did when you
subscribed.
Thanks, Bill Evans for NYHIST-L

From [log in to unmask] Wed Oct 23 22:21:58 1996
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Very late on Sunday night the New York Archaeological Council and 
DASNY reached an agreement, settling the legal suit.  Details are 
just now becoming available and hopefully can be posted here and 
elsewhere when they are.  NYAC did not win on everything but a lot 
more archaeology will be done. Probably more than half of the site 
area will be dug.  A lot for a data recovery in New York State but 
definitely appropriate for this unique site.  

Charles Vandrei
From [log in to unmask] Sat Oct 26 18:31:33 1996
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From: Daniel Martin Dumych <[log in to unmask]>
To: "'NY History List'" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Salt production at Geddes, NY (near Syracuse)?
Date: Sat, 26 Oct 1996 18:36:26 -0400
Encoding: 7 TEXT
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Was the Town of Geddes, NY (on the west shore of Onondaga Lake) especially 
prominent in the production of salt in the 1800's, or was the output of the 
Syracuse area fairly consistent?

Thanks!

Dan  

From [log in to unmask] Fri Oct 25 15:32:54 1996
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From: Burrows <[log in to unmask]>
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Subject: Nathaniel Prime(s)
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Sorry to bother the list with a very minor point, but does anyone out
there know offhand whether the Nathaniel Prime who wrote A HISTORY OF LONG
ISLAND (1845) was related to the NYC merchant of the same name who had
committed suicide in 1837?

Ted Burrows
Brooklyn College

From [log in to unmask] Mon Oct 28 21:44:35 1996
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Message-ID: <[log in to unmask]>
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Subject: Re: Salt production at Geddes, NY (near Syracuse)?
content-length: 277

Dan,
     There is a "Salt Museum" on the east shore of Onondaga Lake on Route
370. That should be enough information to find them in a telephone directory
under Syracuse. Give them a call, I am sure that they can answer your
questions on the salt production in the area.  Les
From [log in to unmask] Mon Oct 28 18:32:46 1996
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Date: Mon, 28 Oct 1996 18:31:56 -0500
Message-ID: <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Nathaniel Prime(s)
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I have three Nathaniel Prime's in my genealogical database, all somehow
connected to New York.  The are:

Nathaniel Prime, b. 01/30/1768, Rowley, Massachusetts.  m. Cornelia Sands,
6/03/1797, New York, New York.  d.  11/26/1840, New York, New York.

Nathaniel Prime, b.  07/23/1830, New York, New York.  d.  07/08/1885, New
York, New York.

Reverend Dr. Nathaniel Scudder Prime, D.D.  b. circa 1778, m. Julia Ann
Jermain, 07/05/1808, Sag Harbor, New York.  d.  03/27/1857, Mamaronack, New
York.

Please let me know if this is helpful !

Joe
From [log in to unmask] Wed Oct 30 01:32:27 1996
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Subject: NYNY 1705-1709
Date: Wed, 30 Oct 96 01:30:48 EST
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1705
	City - EnglandÕs Queen Anne grants local land to be used for St. PaulÕs parish.

	State - Legislation against runaway slaves provides the death penalty for those
found 		more than 40 miles north of Albany.

1706
	State -  A closed season on deer hunting is imposed on Long Island. 

1707
	City - Ebenezer Wilson is appointed mayor; serves to 1710.    **   Presbyterian
 		Francis Makemie is tried and acquitted during a prosecution of dissenters.

1708
Apr 19		New York colonial governor Montgomerie grants New York City a new
charter, enlarging its municipal powers. The city is granted control over all
Brooklyn lands between todayÕs Navy Yard and Red Hook, lying between high and
low water marks.  
Apr 20		Britain's Queen Anne grants 1,500,000 acres of New York land, including
most
 		of the Catskills - the Hardenbergh (Great) Patent, to seven men, headed by
 		Kingston merchant Johannis Hardenbergh.

	State - Kings, Queens and Suffolk Counties close the hunting season on game
birds, to
 		protect dwindling supplies.
	Spain - A bell is cast in Malaga. It will one day be placed in the steeple of
the Episcopal
 		Church in Ellicottville.

1709
	City - A slave market is built at the foot of the main street.

***MLS Online-An Internet BBS. (www.mlsonline.com) Focus: Family, Business &
Education. Voice Support: 716-454-5577
From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct 31 09:10:40 1996
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Subject:  Re: Nathaniel Prime(s) -Reply
content-length: 1


From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct 31 09:23:57 1996
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Subject:  Apologize for blank posting
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Earlier this morning (Oct. 31) I mistakenly sent a blank message to
NYHIST-L regarding the inquiry about the Prime family.  No message was
intended.  My apology to the list subscribers.

Jim Folts
Co-Moderator, NYHIST-L

From [log in to unmask] Wed Oct 30 18:52:19 1996
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Date: Wed, 30 Oct 1996 18:53:35 -0500
To: [log in to unmask]
From: Kim Myers <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Patentees
content-length: 845

Someone wrote and asked me this information, I am
unable to help, but thought maybe someone here could:

On Tue, 29 Oct 1996 07:08:25 -0500 (EST) Joseph Smith
<[log in to unmask]> writes:
>
>Does anyone know where I could get a copy of the list of original
>patentees of Newton Long Island which was dated 1686.
>
>Also
>
>Does anyone know where I could get a copy of any documents pertaining 
>to
>the twelve patentees in New Netherland. (New York) I am not too sure 
>of
>the year but it was likely around 1675. 
>
>Thank you
>Linda Prince Smith


Help?
Thanks!

Kim Harris Myers <[log in to unmask]>
Coordinator for NYS Gen Web page 
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nygenweb/
adopt a county for your own. 
53 down/12 to go- 38 online!
Visit the USGenweb County of the Week:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyononda/INDEX.HTM
====================

From [log in to unmask] Wed Oct 30 14:49:02 1996
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Date: Wed, 30 Oct 1996 14:47:21 +0500 (EST)
From: Melinda Yates <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
cc: [log in to unmask]
Subject: New York State Census Records 
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       Roger Joslyn, a fellow of the American Society of 
Genealogists (FASG), is in the process of updating, with the 
assistance of New York State Library staff, a bibliography the 
State Library last published in 1981 on federal and state census 
records of New York State.

       In the press release that is being sent to various 
historical and genealogical groups in the State, Mr Joslyn writes:

            Last revised in 1981, New York State Library
            Bulletin 88 -- New York State Census Records.
            1790-1925 has provided assistance to genealogists,
            historicans, and other researchers in identifying,
            locating, and utilizing Federal and State census
            records in the Empire State. Fifteen years later,
            this publication is in need of a new update:
            locations of records have changed, indexes have been 
            published, and some previously "missing" censuses
            have been found.

            As part of this updating project, users of these
            valuable records are being asked to contact the State
            Library with any helpful information, such as the
            location of original censuses, and the existence of
            transcriptions, abstracts, and indexes (in manusript
            or published form). Please send your information to
            Melinda Yates, New York State Library, Reference 
            Services, New York State Library, Cultural Education
            Center, Albany, New York 12230. Fax (518) 474-5786.
            E-mail [log in to unmask]


     As coordinator of this project, I would welcome any 
information about these censuses and indexes from subscribers to 
this New York State History Listserv.

     Many thanks.

                                    Melinda Yates
                                    Reference Services
                                    New York State Library     
            

From [log in to unmask] Wed Oct 30 15:29:33 1996
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Date: Wed, 30 Oct 1996 15:25:20 -0500
To: [log in to unmask]
From: [log in to unmask] (Susan Walski)
Subject: Re: Salt production at Geddes, NY (near Syracuse)?
content-length: 536

>Dan,
>     There is a "Salt Museum" on the east shore of Onondaga Lake on Route
>370. That should be enough information to find them in a telephone directory
>under Syracuse. Give them a call, I am sure that they can answer your
>questions on the salt production in the area.  Les
>
I just got this:

The Salt Museum
Onondaga Lake Park
P.O. Box 146
Liverpool, NY  13088
315-453-6715 or 453-6767 Fax:  315-453-6762

Susan
Susan Walski
Genealogy:  The only hobby where finding dead people can excite you!
http://www.eideti.com/~swalski

From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct 31 10:49:59 1996
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Date: Thu, 31 Oct 1996 10:48:37 -0500
From: James Folts <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject:  Patentees -Reply
content-length: 1369

Following is specific information on the Newtown patent of 1686, and
general Information on patents in New York Colony and State:

The text of the letters patent from Governor Thomas Dongan to the
inhabitants of "New Towne on Long Island," dated 25 October 1686, is
printed in Jerrold Seymann, comp., Colonial Charters, Patents and Grants
to the Communities Comprising the City of New York (New York:  Board
of Statutory Consolidation of the City of New York, 1939), pp. 559-67. 
The grant is recorded in Letters Patent, Book 6, pp. 10ff., New York
State Archives.

The State Archives holds the recorded copies of all grants of land or
other privileges by the Crown (1664-1776) and the People of the State of
New York (1777-present).  The Archives also holds applications for land
grants and related documents prior to 1803.  These so-called "Land
Papers" are abstracted and indexed in E. B. O'Callaghan, comp.,
Calendar of N.Y. Colonial Manuscripts Indorsed Land Papers; in the
Office of the Secretary of State of New York.  1643-1803 (Albany: 
Weed, Parsons & Co., 1864; repr. 1987 by Harbor Hill Books).  The
recorded patents and the "Land Papers" are available on microfilm.

Jim Folts
Co-Moderator, NYHIST-L

New York State Archives
Cultural Education Center Room 11D40
Albany, NY 12230  USA
E-mail [log in to unmask]
Phone (518) 474-8955; Fax (518) 473-9985


From [log in to unmask] Thu Oct 31 11:39:54 1996
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Date: Thu, 31 Oct 1996 11:38:14 -0500
From: William Evans <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject:  NY Halloween
content-length: 299

The only appropriate item I could find on this subject is a lovely website
from the University of Texas.  It is an interactive version of The Legend
of Sleepy Hollow, which always seemed very Halloweenie to me.

The site is - http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~daniel/amlit/sleepy/sleepy.html

Bill Evans


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